Judging Criteria

Khairul Rusydi

Co-founder and CEO, Reactor

A former Enterprise Singapore (ESG) scholar, Khairul currently leads Reactor as Co-founder and CEO. Previously serving on the SG Youth Action Panel with the Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth (MCCY), Khairul graduated from NTU with a BSc. in Chemistry and Biological Chemistry (Hons, First Class).

Lin Suling

Executive Editor, CNA Digital

Lin Suling is Executive Editor at CNA Digital, where she established and oversees the award-winning Commentary and Podcasts section. Having served in the Singapore Government for over 11 years, she leads a team discussing the most consequential news of today.

Chantal Sajan

Straits Times Senior Correspondent

Chantal Sajan is an award-winning newspaper designer with over 30 years of experience. A Senior Correspondent for The Straits Times, she also has a multi-disciplinary portfolio spanning private practice corporate logo designs, news design, and story editing.

Darren Tan

Head of Education and Community Outreach, ComCrop

Darren Tan heads the Education and Community Outreach efforts at ComCrop, a rooftop greenhouse farm. He shares knowledge to the new generation of farmers and is involved in projects from ground-up initiatives, policy co-deliberation to sharing youth perspectives.

Part 1

You will be scored on the 5 pillars of IKEA’s Democratic Design.

Judging will take into consideration how your Design Concept ties back to these 5 pillars.

Part 1

You will be scored on the 5 pillars of IKEA’s Democratic Design.

Judging will take into consideration how your Design Concept ties back to these 5 pillars.

Democratic Design creates a beautiful form and function for easier everyday life. It is a quality product that lasts. It thinks of the future and favours sustainability by using materials that are renewable, recyclable and reusable. And it has a low price for the many people to afford. Learn more about Democratic Design.

Each of the 5 pillars will be assessed out of a score of 10, making up a total of 50 points for Part 1.

How well thought out is the programme or is it well-communicated?

Does the visual look appealing?

How well does it work?

How well does it uphold when used?

How long can it last?

Materials used.

Can it be reused, recycled, upcycled?

Does it help others live a more sustainable life?

Is it accessible to the many?

Part 2

After satisfying the previous criteria, your concept will also be assessed and awarded points based on these 3 categories:

Does your idea meet the demands of today’s society while minimising food waste?

(Assessed a maximum score of 30)

Does your idea improve life at home and change or improve how a community reacts and responds?

(Assessed a maximum score of 40)

Does your idea have the potential to inspire many people and make a huge impact towards a future without food waste?

(Assessed a maximum score of 50)